What do the UK's new quarantine rules mean for travellers?

Maintrip June 08, 2020

Last Update: 2020-06-09 14:43:06

The UK has introduced mandatory quarantine for anyone arriving into the country, including returning citizens and residents.

As of 8 June, anyone entering the UK from another country will be required to self-isolate for 14 days. This applies to anyone arriving in by plane, ferry, train or car. Arrivals must fill in an online form, known as the public health passenger locator, with their contact and address details up to 48 hours before entering the country. Failure to fill out the form could result in a £100 ($113) fine. Spot checks will be made and those caught breaching the quarantine rules are subject to a £1000 ($1130) fine, or a £3200 ($3615) fine for supplying incorrect information.

Once a person is at their destination, be it their home or a hotel, they must not use public transport or taxis. They can only leave their accommodation to buy food, other essentials, or to seek medical care. The rules will be reviewed every three weeks as lockdown measures are eased across the UK.

Essential workers such as nurses, doctors, seasonal workers and freight drivers are exempt from quarantine. Those arriving from the Common Travel Area (CTA) - Ireland, the Channel Islands or the Isle of Man - can also bypass quarantine as long as they have not been outside the CTA in the past 14 days.

A sign tells passengers to 'wear a face covering' at Waterloo train station in central London ©Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images
A sign tells passengers to 'wear a face covering' at Waterloo train station in central London ©Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images

As the UK eases lockdown restrictions, groups of up to six people are now permitted to meet up outside the home. Non-essential businesses will open from 15 June, the same day that face coverings will become mandatory in public.

Looking ahead at future travel, the government is considering an "international travel corridor" agreement with countries that have low infection rates, as a way of easing some quarantine rules. But for now, the Foreign Office is still advising against all but essential travel, and with returning citizens required to self-isolate, it looks like "staycations" are on the cards for British holidaymakers this summer.

Source:lonelyplanet

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